Catching up on our Blog prior to our 2016 Summer Cruise

August 2nd, 2016.- Hello dear family and friends, thank you for your continued interest in reading our blog!

Richard and I, Glenda, are very glad to write in our Blog once again after a two year break and share our navigational passage of this Summer. Allow me to give you a brief summary of the last two years.  We settled comfortably on “Elemiah del Mar” for the Autumn and Winter of 2013-2014 at Club Nautico Puerto de Santa Maria. We became members of the Club and made it our home port  for our stay in Spain. We created great friendships, such as Pepe and Loli Barrera, Pikkika y Pikico  Navarro, Mila y Juan Carlos, Manolo and Sylvia Grueso, Pepis Blanco, Joselo and Maribel, Mari Carmen Bobis, Asuncion Fernandez (Richard’s Spanish teacher), Mari y Joaquin, Charo y Chani, Marisa y Robin, Maria del Mar y Serafin, Susi y Pepe Nacar,

In the Summer of 2014 we navigated into the Mediterranean with a group of friends consisting of 5 Spanish boats from Associacion de Navegantes de Andalucia (ANA).  We had planned to write our blog once we parted from the group in Malaga as they were returning to home port in Bay of Cadiz.  In Malaga we were joined as crew by our friend Juan Manuel Figallo who navigated with us to Caleta de Velez and then to Marina del Este near Almunecar.  We really enjoyed entering Marina del Este as it was here that we spent our honeymoon 15 years earlier!

 

Our plan was, to complete our Summer passage in Ibiza. In late September I was planning to return to Houston, Texas to take a new job at the University of Houston. However, life is always full of surprises!!  The next morning Juan Manuel hired a taxi to take a bus back to his car.  Richard and I took the same taxi to Almunecar as I felt very sick.  After dropping him at the bus stop, our medical adventure started! I was transported by ambulance to Motril for critical care of my heart as I was on Atrial Fibrilation and with my mechanical heart valve, I am considered high risk. After a few hours in ICU the doctor decided to do a cardio version on the spot, to my surprise!  Two days later we returned to Malaga for Cardiology follow up.  Two hours later I was in ICU again and next day another cardio version!  By then we got a bit scared in a foreign land and with Richard hardly any Spanish to communicate.  So we called for support to my brother Luis Miguel who lived in Ciudad Real at the time, and lovingly came to stay with us one week.  All our friends from Club Nautico recommended we move to Seville to receive specialized medical care. Our friend Manuel Grueso referred us to an excellent cardiologist, Dr. Ernesto Diaz Infante.  So, with a suitcase on hand we settled for the next two years in Seville in a small flat and kept our boat at the Club Nautico in the Bay of Cadiz.

 

Last July 2015 I was in better health, so I visited my Mom, family and friends in Quito,  Ecuador. Pope Francisco followed me 2 days later! jaja  I was fortunate to see The Pope three times and attend the National Mass. Our dear classmate of Class of Cardenal Spellman 1971, Bruna Stornayolo created  a Facebook page for us!  Such a brilliant idea since we are a close group of Ladies!  My sister, Mildred Hogan together with Bruna organized a reunion for my visit and I was able to reconnect with great friends and some classmates I had not seen in 40 years! It was a great reunion for us all!!

 

Meanwhile Richard navigated to Villa Real de Santo Antonio, Portugal.  We were not aware of a tax for pleasure boats and vehicles, so “elemiah del Mar” had to be out of Spanish waters for 6 months!! I I joined Richard end of July and together we did our Portugal passage for Summer 2015.   We navigated again the coast of Algarve up to Lagos.  We enjoyed the most visiting again Portimao , Faro and La Culatra.  We were careful to do gentle passages to test my heart and my health handled very well.  I had to give up my dream to cross the Atlantic with my Captain Richard as I will only do shorter passages for obvious reasons.  Richard still plans to cross the Atlantic possibly in December 2017 with our friend Peter Jones and hoping that one or more of our children, Juniper, Chris and Ian can take time off from work and their families to do this spectacular passage.  Richard and I will navigate together to the Canaries, then Richard with crew will sail off from Las Palmas de Gran Canaria.   Another change of my life and loss for me was that my cardiologist emphatically recommended that I retire early from my professional work.  It took me several months to adjusting to this unplanned, abrupt end my psychotherapist career!   All this time Richard has been taking Spanish classes and he now has a conversational Spanish, even though he is very challenged with the Andalucian accent. Even I, as a native speaker had much difficulty understanding the first year!  Last Autumn, as I felt better, I decided to restart my interests that I left aside years earlier due to work.  I restarted classes of painting and flamenco.

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on our way from the post of Lagos to Cape St Vincent

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2015 Cruise

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At the Jerez de la Frontera Feria 2016

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In January this year we took an overdue visit to our children, grandchildren, Richard’s sister Aunt Lizzy and dear daughters-in-law, Mariah and Pamela in San Diego, California.  We took residence for two months in our house in Kensington as it was in great need of TLC.  So, very busy painting, pluming, redecorating kitchen, driving a lot for best deals of vendors and products, gardening, etc,  Richard did a great job of redecorating the kitchen!!   While working hard we enjoyed our grandchildren Eloise, Tallulah and August Wilder and reconnected with long time friends.  We even managed to organize a retirement party since San Diego is where I practiced most of my career!

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Pope Francisco in Quito

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Glenda with Juniper outside her San Diego house newly painted outside

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Three Fellows male generations

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Glenda’s Retirement Party with fellow therapists

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Granddaughters Eloise and Tallulah

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Great Aunt Lizzie holding August and sister Tallulah nearby

Whilst we were in San Diego we received the news that the tenant of our apartment in Hollywood Florida was leaving!  We were sure that the apartment needed painting and more TLC so as we were in the USA why not drive back to Houston visit Juniper.  Met up with Belinda and husband who has a collection of over 200 that they had to buy a warehouse.

Then onto Florida.  A long way!!!.  indeed the Florida apartment was in serious need to be painted.  However, nothing in vain we were able to catch up with good friends  Chiqui, Nancy Gomez, Magdalena Conway , Glenda’s cousin Danilo Caamano Vega + Family and Richard met up with an old friend Bill he had not seen since 1981.

Then back to Espana and prepare Elemiah for the summer.  Every 2 years the boat needs to be hauled out and the bottom repainted with antifouling paint.  We also decided as Elemiah is steel and has a painted hull we will make a change from the standatd white hull.  So Glenda was back to picking out a colour scheme.  Richard then for the third time painted the hull Aqua green and gray stripes.  As you all know painting houses as well as boats reqires a great deal of time deciding on the colour which takes a lot of time and patience.

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New Paint Job

Well,this has been the year of painting and remodeling!!

A week ago I had to go to London for a few days and so!   to accompany our dear friend Alicia during the funeral of her husband, our friend John.  During this time, and taking advantage of good winds, Richard sailed off from our new home port, Puerto Sherry in Puerto de Santa Maria, to Gibraltar where I flew back last Saturday evening.  We enjoyed a few restful days and an English language fix for Richard.

 

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Elemiah moored under the Rock of Gibraltar

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Glenda walking on water

Lagos to Ayamonte (Rio Guadiana)

Many apologies for being so slow in updating our blog. Time and lack of internet have been in the way!!

We left off our last blog with our arrival in Lagos, Portugal.  2 days later Juniper arrived

from Houston, USA to spend a few days with us.  The weather was great and allowed us to anchor off a beach outside Lagos to go swimming and generally relax. While in Lagos we enjoyed an evening of a Flamenco Festival that a local fan kindly let us purchase the tickets reserved in his name as it was sold out!  He and his family enjoyed the festival other two nights.

Juniper Relaxing off Lagos

Juniper Relaxing off Lagos

More Relaxing

More Relaxing

Our next port of call with Juniper aboard was Portimao where we anchored off a small village Ferragudo. https://maps.google.co.uk/maps?q=portimao+portugal&ie=UTF-8&ei=thymUuzkFqzB7AaY84CIBA&ved=0CAoQ_AUoAg

Juniper was anxious to go scuba diving and we found a group the next day.  Glenda and Juniper left with the Scuba Diving group and Richard moved Elemiah to a more popular anchorage nearer the mouth of the river.  On motoring into the anchorage our good friends Jesper & Dorthe from Denmark were anchored there.  We had not met since La Coruna.

Diving off Portimao 2

Diving off Portimao 2

Juniper

Juniper

In the morning, anchored just outside the river entrance was the world’s largest sailing passenger ship http://www.windstarcruises.com/windsurf-yacht.aspx  This is the same ship that Richard’s sister, Liz reported to have seen in Falmouth, UK.

Largest Sailing Cruise ship outside Portimao

Largest Sailing Cruise ship outside Portimao

Today Juniper arranged to go scuba diving with a group who operate off a beach further down the coast.  So early in the morning we anchored off the beach and Juniper became the first diver to join a diving  group lead by Arturo Cardoso, http://www.exclusive-divers.net/algarve from a yacht.

Juniper being picked up off beach

Juniper being picked up off beach

Juniper returning from her dive

Juniper returning from her dive

After the dive we up anchored and set off to find some dolphins for Juniper but sadly they did not pay us a visit!  However the sail was great with awesome weather.and memorable photos. At the end of the day we arrived in a port called Vilamoura, Portugal.

This is sailing!

This is sailing!

Glenda & Richard sailing towards Vilamoura

Glenda & Richard sailing towards Vilamoura

The reason for being here was to be close to Faro airport for Juniper to catch a plane back home.  Let it be known that Vilamoura is a little like Blackpool, avoid if at all possible!  The only thing that was really awesome was a beach morning in a fabulous sand!

We bid farewell to Juniper whose visit was all too short!  Next day we went on to Faro which is inside a tidal lagoon https://maps.google.es/maps?q=faro+portugal&oe=UTF-8&ie=UTF-8&ei=hB-mUpjqC6ad7gbTrIDIDw&ved=0CAoQ_AUoAg  We made it as close as we could to Faro but owing to some very shallow waters it was still quite a dinghy ride to town.  To enter Faro in our dinghy we had to wait for low tide to go under the lowest bridge under a train track!  At low tide all you see is a bank then like going up in an elevator at high tide the ocean was there.  Faro was very nice and very little tourism surprisingly.  The last time Richard was here was in early 1970’s and little changed since then.

Elemiah anchored off Faro

Elemiah anchored off Faro

View of Anchorage from Faro

View of Anchorage from Faro

Glenda on sans island exposed at low tide

Glenda on sand island exposed at low tide

After two or three days anchored off Faro we moved to an anchorage off the Llha (island) Da Culatra which was very pleasant.  In our opinion, the most recommended anchorage in all of Algarve!

During our stay Richard did his routine check on Elemiah and found that the fuel injector was leaking quite badly.  As Elemiah is well equipped with spares we had a spare reconditioned injector aboard.  However, we needed to be in a marina whilst Richard replaced the unit.  The closest marina in the lagoon in a town called Olhao.  We motored about 45 minutes to Olhao and to our amazement were waved away from berthing.  We even explained our situation and made it sound much worse but still were given the Portuguese gesture to get lost!!  We then went back to our anchorage coughing diesel from the bilge into the beautiful ocean.

We had no option but to move onto the Guadiana River that divides Spain and Portugal.  We made it safely to the river and decided our best plan was to moor on the Spanish side in the town of Ayamonte as we had the language if we needed mechanical help.  As we motored up the river we saw our Danish friends tied up on the Portuguese side, they told us to go in there as it was very inexpensive, we explained our situation and headed to Ayamonte paying quite a bit more per night. https://maps.google.es/maps?q=ayamonte+spain&ie=UTF-8&ei=hCWmUp7cEaLH7AbKhoHQDA&ved=0CAoQ_AUoAg

Next instalment to follow shortly.

Leixoes to Lagos Portugal

We left Baiona to our first Port of Entry in Portugal which was a harbour called Leixoes just north of Porto.  We anchored in the outer harbour but during the night the wind got up at least 25 knots and clocked around 360 degrees with thunder and lightning!  We were regularly checking on Elemiah.  However, at the height of the storm Richard looked out about 3 am and saw us dragging anchor and heading to the harbour wall.  So in the middle of the night bucketing with rain, lightening and the wind howling we were literally arms out in our pajamas, soaking wet holding Elemiah off an ancient sea wall whilst grabbing fenders.  Finally hauling on the anchor we got the bow pointed out and Glenda on the helm gunned Elemiah out of a potentially disastrous situation.  We then took shelter in the inside marina.  At 7:00 am we inspected the damage, unbelievably we escaped with just slight scratches!  Glenda thanks the day Richard said we should not get a pretty fiberglass boat, but rather a steel boat. She takes strength over stylish a million times!!

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The Sea Wall

Next day Glenda geared up for her first overnight and at least 24  hour sail to Navare and took some seasickness pill (she hates taking meds!)  Unfortunately for sailors, the Portuguese fishermen put down their fishing pots out to 20 miles off shore.  So as we were travelling through the night we had to be out more than 20 miles! This involved 5 hours extra on our journey!

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Yoga on Passage

Navare is a small fishing town and the small marina had that fishy smell.  We are boaters who use the marina shower these showers were the worst we have come across. On Saturday, being the weekend, and no marina staff we found the water cold and no one to complain to!

In town we saw the women going around in traditional dresses so we thought that there must be a show that they were off to.  Before too long we realized that they were for real! With the widows appropriately dressed in black.

On Saturday, with a severely reduced bus schedule we made it to two towns with historic Cathedral and Basillica.

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On returning, we found our friends on Laakola rafted off us which was a pleasant surprise.

A wild storm last winter knocked the port side entry light into the water and are not expecting it to be fixed for many years.

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Entrance Light to Navare

All of us left in the morning to Peniche.  On arriving in Peniche we tied up to the marina to find that the staff are not there on the weekend so no key to leave and as we were leaving the next day no one to pay!!

Next port of call is an up market town of Cascais situated at the mouth of the river leading up to Lisbon.  As it was our anniversary Glenda and went into town dressed well to find the Portuguese are different from the hospitable Spanish.  The first restaurant were quite abrupt in their manner of dealing with us, the next restaurant wanted to know what we wanted, on hearing we wanted a meal simply told us with no apology that he closes early!  We did find somewhere to serve us so all was well.

Although the weather is hot during the day at night the Atlantic breeze is quite cool.  Juniper is meeting us and thought it best to meet up in the Algarve as the climate is much warmer by day and night.  So we took another 26 hour hop to Lagos passing by another famous cape St Vincent.

Cabo St Vincente

Cabo St Vincente

On rounding Cabo St Vincente we encountered a levante wind blowing 25/30 knots on our nose.  The sea was literally breaking into the entrance to Lagos so surfed our way in.

Isla Cies, Atlantic Islands National Park to Baiona

Islas Atlanticas, Parque Nacional, Espana

Islas Atlanticas, Parque Nacional, Espana

Off, the three of us went to Cies and anchored in a bay of the larger island,” Isla Del Norte” (bay 4 on the above photo).   By the time we anchored and launched the dinghy it was pitch black.  We landed on the beach, and with the help of mobile phone torch (Flashlight) application made our way up a track following Teresa. She knows the islands very well and is very protective of them!  We thought the island was totally uninhabited but after awhile to our surprise we stumbled on a restaurant!!  There are people who are long time residents before it was made a national park plus campers and some boaters.  It all closes at end of Summer and the birds and see life can have peace from so many tourists!!

The next day we explored the island on foot and later in the day by dinghy to another bay.  Glenda walked to the top of the Light “Faro in the heat and since Teresa had done several times she kept Richard company healing from his bad back.  We occasionally make exception to our Vegetarian diet, like being in an island and only can eat seafood, so we tried fantastic  “ pulpo” (octopus)  salad.  By the time we returned to Elemiah it was pitch black again as no moonlight.  We had not put the anchor light on but could pick out Elemiah from 2 garden solar lights mounted in the winches.  The night was so quiet and beautiful we were one sailing and one motor boat in the whole bay!

Glenda & Teresa

Glenda & Teresa

The next day we decided to visit  the smaller island, Isla Sur (bay 3 on photo).  Teresa contacted a resident  friend of hers and was anxious to share his company with us. Teresa’s friend, Paco has his primary house in the island for many many years before it became protected as a National Park, therefore he and his wife are only one of 3 residents in the island. His wife does not visit much any more due to illness, she stays at Vigo. Paco is the President of the Committe of resident of all the Islands who together help protect the islands. We landed on the beach early in the morning of Sunday and there was Paco out with his dog walking on the beach.

Paco in green shirt and guests.

Paco in green shirt and guests.

From there it was a party and great Galician wine from Paco’s cellar.  Paco gave us a private extraordinary hike to the other side of the island. As all in life Paco and us also bonded as parents who share a special company, we know the pain of loosing a son and daughter!

Hiking with Paco

Hiking with Paco

 

The other end of the Island, an ancient mill

The other end of the Island, an ancient mill

We were able to contribute food for the evening meal as he was not expecting us and brought gluten free supplies for Glenda, brought milk, whatever as his refrigerator was down.  No matter, we were joined by his friends and together we created a feast of a meal.  By the end of the evening we were exhausted and our kind host Paco gave us a bedroom instead of making it back to Elemiah.  In Spanish style we were having dinner at midnight!!

Paco, had not anticipated all the guests and needed more food so whilst we were sleeping Paco and Javier, his young guest took our dinghy and laid a net to catch fish at 2:am!   By the morning Paco had brought in a plentiful supply of fish and gutted them.  Javier cooked a vegetarian paella for us!

Elemiah on Paco's private mooring

Elemiah on Paco’s private mooring

Our host Paco Conde

Our host Paco Conde

By the end of the day, Paco raided his cellar to give us some good Galician wine as a farewell gift!  We asked him to visit us in Rota, and warmly bid Paco goodbye.  We  returned our guest Teresa to Vigo who had her sweet mother and brother picking her up at the harbour.  Galician hospitality is the best we have experienced ever!!!

From Vigo we stayed a couple of nights in the last and beautiful town in Spain Baiona!  To all our fellow sailors, Baiona is a great town to visit the Pinta replica for only 2 euros, enjoy a visit to the sailing club and stock up with Galician food and wine. Next morning we said good bye to Spain and its wonderful hosts for a while!

View from castle wall overlooking charming Biaona Harbour

View from castle wall overlooking charming Biaona Harbour

Replica of Pinta, one of Colon's vessels  that arrived back from the New World to Baiona Harbor.

Replica of Pinta, one of Colon’s vessels that arrived back from the New World to Baiona Harbor.

 

Ria Pontevedra and Vigo, Spain

To our dear followers of our blog we apologize for the delay in writing, it is sometimes hard to get a good internet and then we have to go when there is good wind!  So here is our update for Our next stop in Ria Pontevedra was a small fishing town of Porto Nova.  With an on shore wind we went into this small marina.  As we were berthing,  Elemiah nudged against the wood on the pontoon which would have been no problem except there was a screw protruding that cut an inch through the paint to the steel.   Glenda used here good Spanish and told the harbour office that Richard was Furioso which did the trick as we had 3 free nights!  Luckily we had some epoxy filler on board and all is well.

Our reason to stop at Porto Novo is that it is cheaper than the next town Sanxenxo where the finish of the first leg of La Rueda de Espana (Spain’s equivalent to the Tour de France) was taking place next day.  We set off on our fold up bicycles to Sanxenxo and as the sea front road was closed to traffic we took the race route all the way to the finish line.  We were sure we would be stopped by the police but instead we got ovations from the crowd gathering early to see the race!  We waved back to the crowd in good spirit and famous for a few minutes! J  Glenda grew up coming out with family to watching the cyclists race in the Panamerican Highway in the Andes, so she thoroughly enjoyed seeing the cyclists pass so close.  We chatted with a nice family from a City of spain situated in Africa, Ceuta.

La Rueda de Espana

La Rueda de Espana

Our next stop was Ria Vigo and to the main city of Pontevedra Province, Vigo to get permission to visit one of the protected Atlantic Islands Isla Cies.

We tied up at the Real Club Nautica Vigo (Royal Yacht Club).  The club staff were helpful in telling us the only way was to fax our documents to the Park Authority and expect a reply by e-mail.  The club faxed the documents.  However, another English couple we had met earlier in our travels, Paul & Ann told us where the park office was and all we had to do is go there and they will issue a permit.  If you do not have a permit it is a 5,000 euro fine!

We were attended to by Teresa.  We then needed to find the immigration office and Teresa took us to the street to show the way in good Spanish style.  She was so “amable” (amiable), we extended and invitation to visit us on Elemiah and that led to Teresa taking time off work and go with us to Isla Cies! We developed a great friendship!

Glenda, Richard & Teresa

Glenda, Richard & Teresa

Before we left, Teresa introduced us to a friend of her’s who is an acupuncturist (Used to be a banker).  Well Jose hosted us at his house whilst he treated Glenda for sea sickness which she had done before in Vilagarcia.  Richard had pulled a muscle in his back taking our head (toilet, potty) apart to fix a leak.  Yuk!  So Jose did a very successful adjustment!  The next day Jose came to Elemiah for some EMDR from Glenda to overcome the fear of flying as an introduction to the EMDR technique and thanking for helping us heal our little bothers.

View from Jose's house overlooking Ria Vigo

View from Jose’s house overlooking Ria Vigo

Ria De Arousa & Ria Pontevedra

Whilst still in a marina in Vilagarcia de Arousa we met Jose owner of the local chandlery who had his wheel covered in leather by a man in Pontevedra.  It took a struggle to get our wheel off and with the help of a marina personnel (Cecil) who had an extractor, off the wheel came!  We arranged to leave the wheel at a bar in Pontevedra.

Nacho the Barman

Nacho the Barman

Very trusting as the wheel (La Rueda) is the only means to operate Elemiah! 

The short story is that 600,000 plus young Spaniards descended on Vilagarcia for a straight 20 hrs festival with fun electronic music, yet right on our noses. the festival started about 20 yrs ago as asimple religious parade yo the church ofSan Roque and the villagers were asking for some water after they went uphill in the middle of the heat.  Now after the festival, everyone goes tothe church and they get really wet!! like carnaval at the style of Ecuador in February.  Difficult to sleep through all that! as the wheel was not done, we collected it from Nacho the barman and high tailed it out of the Marina to a very quie t anchorage in the bay of Cabo de Cruz for 2 days.  Ashore we met Rosa who entertained us at her house and we in turn had her over to Elemiah in the evening  Rosa had moved 30 yers ago to Paris and became a professional makeup artist for theater and movies.  Her last movie was Troy with Brad Pitt!  She comes down to this beautiful little fishing village every Summer for her connection with family and roots.

We then up anchor and off to the next Ria of  Pontevedra.  After the town of Pontevedra,  our port of call was Combarro arriving 18/8/2013.  Off we went on a short taxi ride to the town of Pontevedra with wheel to Nacho’s bar. Glenda happened to take advantage of local nespaper reading and found it that one ofher favorite Spanish singers is giving a free concert!  Then on to attend the  concert given by Paloma San Basilio who is going around the country giving her last concerts before retiring.

Taking a dip in Cabo de Cruz

Taking a dip in Cabo de Cruz

Richard on Deck

Richard on Deck

Glenda taking a refreshment

Glenda taking a refreshment

Elemiah at anchor

Elemiah at anchor

Glenda got the scissors to her shirt

Glenda got the scissors to her shirt

The man who was putting leather on our wheel is called Compacho although Richard found it easier to refer to him as Gazpacho!  Anyhow, Gazpacho finished the wheel and we met him at another cafe in Pontevedra. In the meantime we visited the beautiful 9th cdntury city of Pontevedra which has beginnings in the Roman days. Here we are with our leathered wheel.

La Rueda

La Rueda at Camino de Santiago

Then we were going to leave Combarro for a bay that had many visiting classic  French and Spanish wooden yachts.  We were near departing and found out that after 4 days we had a free day at the marina, and had to wait for our laundry!  Low and behold the wooden boats turned up at our marina for lunch!.  We were invited for wine and food aboard a Spanish yacht designed by British designer David Hillyard. I fever you can try “pimientos de padron” cooked simple with olive oil!!  The tapas most famous vegetarian dish of Galicia

Fun aboard the Hillyard

Fun aboard the Hillyard with Manuel the chef of the pimientos and a fellow English female sailor, Anne

Hillyard again

Hillyard again shaking an Irish sailor

On the right Javier owner of the Hillyard

Brothers Javier  and Fernando owners of the Hillyard and Fernando a talented sailmaker

Until the next post farewell and us on to Portonovo to see the start of  the” Vuelta de Espana” and Glenda can reminisce her days in the Andes coming out to the highway to watch cyclists’ tours!

By the way do not worry if you have not had a blog and you see bad weather in our area.  We try not to venture out in bad weather.

Glenda & Richard

Journey Progress

Since leaving A Coruna we went to Camarinas then went by Cape Finneterre also known as Costa Del Morte (Coast of Death).  Cape Finisterre was at one point the most westerly point in the known world.  We probably should have stopped and walked out to the end of the cape but the nearby anchorage was too exposed to the northerly winds.  We wanted to go to a sheltered point and then take a taxi but while Glenda is getting used to the sea again and gets a bit seasick, so we elected to press on to Ria Muros.  We anchored off Muros had a cup of tea then decided to go over and anchor off Portosin and use the WIFI at the yacht club there. This area is very busy with Spaniards on holiday in August.

Spent a couple of nights anchored off Portosin then went on to the next Rias de Arousa.  De Arousa is the biggest Ria (Spanish for Estuary) and known to be the nicest.  As we entered in the hot afternoon sun we saw boats anchored off an island beach so made our way there.  The bottom dropped off rapidly so the anchor depth was 20 metres.  Later all the boats left.  At that point knowing the winds were from the north and onshore in relatively deep water we up anchor and went over to a more sheltered bay.  We were the only pleasure yacht there.  During the night the wind did get up so luckily we were nicely tucked in.

The next day we went to a marina in Vilagarcia de Arousa as Glenda wanted to do a 25 kilometre pilgrimage walk along the last part of the Portuguese Camino (Road) to Santiago de Compostela.  I was going to take the Train! so we needed the boat in a marina. Glenda’s walk was in the memory of David and for all Juniper’s wishes to come true.

As much as I tried to discourage Glenda saying it was hot, hilly and she was not fit for a 25 KM walk she did set off and made the journey.  It is unbelievable the number of pilgrims who arrive in Santiago de Compostela each day!  In 2008, 125,141 pilgrims registered. Glenda saw a lot of pilgrims on her stretch and most had walked many days.  The route is centuries old and fascinating.  There are 3 main routes.  The French Camino, The Portuguese Camino originating in Lisbon and The English originating in the port of A Coruna. The Cathedral is the most visited Catholic site after St Peter’s in Rome.  St James is reportedly buried here.  St James was beheaded in Judea and remains were taken up the Ria we are currently in, Ria De Arousa.  Glenda’s walk started at Padron where a church was built around the stone that reportedly was used to tie up the boat carrying St James’ remains. Richard also did a little repair in the dinghy. Tomorrow we are setting of to Ria Pontevedra.

Glenda arriving in front of Santiago de Compostela Cathedral

Glenda arriving in front of Santiago de Compostela Cathedral

End of the Known World

End of the Known World

 

Glenda At The Helm

Elemiah at anchor

Elemiah at anchor

 

Glenda At The Helm

Glenda At The Helm

A Pilgrim and Husband

A Pilgrim and Husband